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CMUT: Capacitive micro-machined ultrasonic transducers

Presenter: Dr Johan Klootwijk Philips Research, The Netherlands
Start: 16:25 (55 minutes)

Abstract

Capacitive micro-machined ultrasonic transducers (CMUT) are MEMS based structures that transmit and receive acoustic signals in the ultrasonic range. They enable breakthrough applications for ultrasound, complementing conventional piezo technology with advantages such as small form factor, large bandwidth, easy fabrication of large arrays, and integration with driver circuitry: CMUT-on-CMOS for 3D ultrasound. CMUT devices from Philips use the so-called collapse mode, with increased output pressure and sensitivity compared to devices in non-collapse mode. A DC voltage is used to collapse the top electrode on the bottom electrode. This CMUT technology is well suited and optimized for medical applications, ranging from general probes towards integration in catheters. By changing device architecture (dimensions, layer thickness, gap height, layer stress,..), one can tune the device for different applications. In this tutorial I would like to elaborate on the physics and (process) development of CMUTs, their potential applications (including some examples) and the use of test structures that have proven to also be very useful in CMUT development.

Biography

Capacitive micro-machined ultrasonic transducers (CMUT) are MEMS based structures that transmit and receive acoustic signals in the ultrasonic range. They enable breakthrough applications for ultrasound, complementing conventional piezo technology with advantages such as small form factor, large bandwidth, easy fabrication of large arrays, and integration with driver circuitry: CMUT-on-CMOS for 3D ultrasound. CMUT devices from Philips use the so-called collapse mode, with increased output pressure and sensitivity compared to devices in non-collapse mode. A DC voltage is used to collapse the top electrode on the bottom electrode. This CMUT technology is well suited and optimized for medical applications, ranging from general probes towards integration in catheters. By changing device architecture (dimensions, layer thickness, gap height, layer stress,..), one can tune the device for different applications. In this tutorial I would like to elaborate on the physics and (process) development of CMUTs, their potential applications (including some examples) and the use of test structures that have proven to also be very useful in CMUT development.